Who We Are

The Middle East Forum For Policies and Future Studies supports pluralistic approach to future studies and promotes human rights sensitive policies and works on advising stakeholders on a strategic level all over the middle east region. It is composed of Arab and International political, diplomatic figures who want to become a leading center in the area of future studies at regional and international level.
Middle East Forum

Latest Reports

What is divided by politics could be reunited by economics - Renewed Turkish-Emirati relations

What is divided by politics could be reunited by economics - Renewed Turkish-Emirati relations

By: Jalal Bakkar

In light of the global economic disruption and political confusion, I think that everyone agrees on the importance of reducing escalation in the region and to agree that all parties need platforms for dialogue and negotiations to bring the region into a calm environment through which the region can be stabilized. This is initially to
correct previous mistakes, and open new pages whose titles are based on the public interest, growth, and prosperity at all social and economic levels. Also, such a reality could reform the political disputes that can be resolved through channels for understandings, and value-added of all parties.

Latest Research & Studies

Syria’s Kurds from Federalism to Administrative Decentralization

Syria’s Kurds from Federalism to Administrative Decentralization

By: Abdul Rahim Muhammad Saeed Saeed

The timeline of the Syrian Kurds witnessed an obvious disparity in terms of the national demands, coinciding with the change of the political eras, through which Syria passed, and the governments that ruled the country, from independence until today. The most prominent shift remains the one that occurred after the Syrian revolution, because the demands have been in parallel with practical practices geographically and politically, especially after the Democratic Union Party (PYD) took control of the Kurdish populated areas, and began implementing its own projects on the ground.
These projects varied, reaching their climax upwards to the announcement of the federal project in 2016, and the start of serious steps to implement this very project on the ground, and then descending again to launch negotiations on a kind of decentralized system of governance with the Syrian regime by the Democratic Union Party, or with the Syrian opposition by the Kurdish National Council. These changes came under the influence of military and political factors on the one hand, and factors related to the nature of the region - geographically and demographically - which was the ground of these projects on the other hand.